Part 2- Why Aren’t You Finishing Projects?

Part 2- Why Aren’t You Finishing Projects?

Is it time to focus and finish your projects for this quarter?

Before you answer, click here to read my article from two weeks ago– “Why Aren’t You Finishing Projects (Part 1).”

Here are my thoughts on “Why Aren’t You  Finishing Projects – Part 2”: 

The main answer is that you are juggling TOO MANY projects.

Below is my graphic explaining another concept from Todd Herman.

This example shows what happens if you juggle 5 projects, versus tackling one at a time:

This shows you the impact of “context switching”– when your brain and effort is spread across multiple things.

As Todd explains it, if it takes 4 hours to finish one project, and you do one hour a week on 5 project at a time, it takes you 16 weeks to finish Project A.

If you work on only Project A, you are finished in 4 weeks.

Now I realize that some projects take more time and require waiting on other people, but I think the concept is pretty clear.

One finished and implemented project is worth 50 started and abandoned ones.

If you need a bit of inspiration/ motivation to keep plugging on Project A, re-read the article PART 1.

So pick one half-finished project and make a commitment to power through and “get ‘r’ done” by the end of the 13-week quarter.

Image from Todd Herman

Part 1 – Why Aren’t You Finishing Projects?

Part 1 – Why Aren’t You Finishing Projects?

You, small business manager, want to improve things.

I will bet dollars to Freddy’s Famous Buffalo donuts that you have a “wish list” of projects you want to implement, and you have started some of them.

Yet your office (and mine) is littered with books unread, binders from great workshops, possibly brochures or saved emails with a system or process that sounds great. One you want to investigate that just might make your business operate more smoothly or more profitably.

Hey, we are idea people and we are starters (maybe not finishers).

When you do start something new with anticipation, this most likely happens (image from Todd Herman):

One of the most persistent complaints I hear from employees of small business is that “we don’t finish what we start” and that the owners/ managers are always adopting the latest book advice or stuck in chasing shiny objects syndrome.

Making changes, finishing a project or new process, and getting everyone on board and sticking with it is HARD.

You have to be patient and persistent to make progress, and to stay positive with all the set backs and challenges you encounter.

Four things you can do to start and finish your projects:

  1. Do ONLY ONE at time (more about this next week)
  2. Enlist the help of your team– don’t do it all yourself
  3. Create an action plan with weekly action items and assign tasks to specific people with a deadline
  4. Meet weekly (same time) to review what is complete, what needs to be discussed/ decided, and what is next

As a bonus– get an “Accountability Buddy” outside of your team/ company (a colleague or a consultant) who will hold you accountable to make progress, keep you motivated, and help you work through the inevitable bumps on the road.

Maybe even decide the reward you will give the team to celebrate– such as a “pizza party” or outing or something nice for the office (plants? Fooze ball table?). This can keep you motivated as you slog through the tough parts and keep you sprinting toward the finish line.

Image from Todd Herman

Step 2 of 6 to Coach for Accountability –  Weekly Coaching

Step 2 of 6 to Coach for Accountability – Weekly Coaching

Read my last article on Step 1 to coach for accountability [clarify who does what].

Step 2 is to start Weekly Coaching Conversations:

6 Steps to Coach For Accountability & High Performance [see all 6 steps on my 1 minute video slideshare].

Your employees want and need ongoing direction & feedback & support & recognition, so that they can focus on high priority actions.

Just like a sailboat, if they drift just one degree off course every week they can end up going East instead of North.

You need them to tell you when they are stuck, if they need clarification or resources, and to make more informed decisions.

You also want them to make progress on projects beyond their daily tasks.

All of these employee and manager needs can be met with a 15-minute “weekly coaching conversation”

Weekly Coaching Conversation [Check Ins] Agenda:

  1. Results on individual/ team KPI [key performance indicators]
  2. Status update on ongoing tasks [what my manager needs to know]
  3. Status update on project action items
  4. Challenges- where are you stuck or need more help?
  5. Priorities for this week

….I know you are thinking “how am I going to squeeze in weekly chats with every one of my team?”

I will be honest, the first few weeks are hard for managers to schedule, but then they find something miraculous ….

After a few weeks– people start changing how they interact with their managers:

  • They hold the “do you have a second” updates and questions for their weekly chat [time saved 5+ minutes per day x per person]
  • You don’t have to chase people down to get status updates — you know you will hear them on your weekly chats [time saved 10 minutes x per person]
  • They start completing project action items that you assigned but never went anywhere [1+ hours per week of new “to-dos” completed x per person]
  • You now have a way to start handing off small action items on the bigger projects to someone else [time saved 1-2 hours week of your time]
  • You don’t have to put out fires because someone forgot or were stuck or handled something badly [time saved 1+ hour per week]

When you think about all the time you spend on all these reactive activities, it adds up to well over 15 minutes per person.

Would it be better to have a pre-planned time carved out of your schedule to be proactive, to give direction, feedback, support, recognition, and coach for learning and improved decision making and time management?

If you have more than 10 people, over time you can designate and train a “team leader” to have these weekly conversations with the team and just bring you the weekly team updates [time saved 15 minutes x per person]. As an added benefit, this process develops your high potential employees into team leaders.

As with anything that is “good for you” it takes a bit of effort to change your habits and the habits of your team, and diligence to keep consistency and progress.

Managers who master this habit say they would never go back to their old ways.

Next Steps:

In my next article, I will share details on Step 3 “Action Plans for Development and Business Improvement” [see all 6].

Step 1 of 6 to Coach for Accountability – Clarify Roles

Step 1 of 6 to Coach for Accountability – Clarify Roles

Are you interested in everyone on your team taking on more responsibility?

I mean real responsibility — when they “own” the work, solve issues, make suggestions and even improve the process, and [the ultimate level] keep you in the loop with status updates or “exception” reports.

You might even have a few people who do this now… but you would like EVERYONE on staff to do this. [Keep reading for the First of the 6 steps…]

This magical state is called the “Accountability Culture” — and blends the benefits of a Results Culture and a Caring Culture, and the top ranked most-effective leadership style that blends concern for People with a focus on Results.

Accountability is not a new concept, but it has become a high priority for the business owner and manager who wants to spend more time on business planning and management and less time on getting the daily work done.

If your team “does what they are supposed to do” then managers are freed up to work on the business- revenue generation, process improvement, cost control and great team and customer experiences. If your pants are on fire you can’t plan and improve your business.

Let me be clear—- Positive Accountability is essential to grow your business.

Last week I spoke to 91 planners and managers in operations, who work for companies with 50-500 employees. Guess what? These organizations are also challenged with building accountability on their teams.

Here is your opportunity to take your smaller more agile company and out-perform you competitors, with
6 Steps to Coach For Accountability & High Performance.

Step 1 is to clarify the Roles, Responsibilities and Results of your key people:

Employees want to have four main questions clarified about their role (although they rarely ask them):

If you cannot answer these questions about your role and those of your key people,
you will not be able to effectively hold them accountable for results.

1. What is my role?
2. What does “good” look like?
3. What is my responsibility?
4. What results should I produce?

To Learn More:

Click to download detailed Guide to Building Your Team: Right People, Right Role

For a detailed outline of how to accomplish Step 1 [Clarify Roles and Responsibilities], see page 7.

See all 6 Steps to Coach for Accountability [Slideshow]

11 Reasons Why Employees Don’t Do the Job

11 Reasons Why Employees Don’t Do the Job

Determining the cause of a performance issue can be like being a detective– here is a list of 11 major reasons employees “don’t do the job” with possible solutions.

Source: Expectations

1. They don’t know what to do
2. They think they are doing it
Solution: I read many job descriptions—hundreds per year from dozens of organizations—rarely do they clarify for me the specific job activities and key results areas, much less how the job will be measured. It is difficult to hold someone accountable to results when the manager has not made it crystal clear what those results should be and what s/he has to do to get those results. Otherwise employees just take their best guess and do what seems to be the most urgent.

3. They think something else is more important
Solution: A great survey report showed that employees only agree with managers on 1 out of 3 priorities! Frequent coaching and follow up makes sure that what a person is working on is the highest priority for the job and department. An employee does the best she can reading the tea leaves to guess what her manager thinks is priority. Don’t make them guess… also, remember employees often don’t have the broader view or much information outside of their own activities (and yes, the more they do the better decisions they will make.)

Source: Training

4. They don’t know how to do it
Solution: Work with employee to identify skill or competency to enhance with training, create a training plan with a timeline and hold employee accountable to stick to the plan (even if it means reminding her manager to schedule the time or resources).

5. They are uncomfortable doing it
Solution: Sometimes a little training can increase someone’s confidence and they become “comfortable” with the task and then perform it regularly. More likely this is a symptom of job fit—someone’s personality traits or competencies are not aligned with those required to excel in the job. A classic example is “asking for the sale”— a person who is cooperative (lower assertive) can be trained for years on sales techniques and given scripts, but he is always uncomfortable closing. For job fit, the remedy is to change the job duties to ones that correspond with the person’s strengths and attributes.

6. They lack the competency needed to do it 

Solution: Depending on the type of competency, the person may benefit from more training and development. However, many competencies are a function of personality traits that are ingrained and difficult to change even with extensive training. For example, “planning and organizing” is a set of traits and habits that your employee may not have and will be challenged to overcome in a role that requires tracking and pacing their work on month-long project. In many cases, the solution is finding a better job fit for the incumbent’s competencies.

Source: Feedback/ Recognition

7. They can do it but don’t want to
8. They are rewarded for not doing it
9. They are not rewarded when they do it

Solution: This is fundamental psychology. People do what is measured and recognized and rewarded. If they are not rewarded (or worse, “punished”) for doing something, most people stop doing it. Sales people don’t like to do paperwork—but they also don’t want to be reminded that they were late 9 of the last 10 weeks—this is powerful feedback.

Often the signals sent by managers are unintended. Do you reward your poor performers by giving extra work to others that you can depend on? Do you remember to praise and even publicly recognize the team that worked last weekend to finish up a project?

Source: Belief

10. They don’t know why they should do it

Solution: Some people will blindly follow rules, but most want to know the “why” behind something that they are asked to do. It they believe a task or process is x (insert label here: low importance, arbitrary, a waste of time, or just plain stupid), no amount of training will effect a change in behavior. You might get begrudging compliance but that is about it. To get commitment, you have to explain the “why” to change the belief. (Until they believe his IS important, worth my time, etc.)

11. They think their way is better.

Solution: Read the solution above… plus this often happens when you ask someone who is good/ comfortable with the “old way” and now you have a “new way.” And in the beginning, the old way is better since an employee is more comfortable and competent in the old way. A big part of culture change and process change is to overcome the belief that the old way is better.

A key personality trait is openness to new experiences and some people are not. They will cling to the things they know how to do. As a manager you will need to support and coach these employees through the pain and fear that comes with change. Recognize that this is more deep seeded than just a training issue, but a consistent personality trait or a cognitive filter (belief) and be patient and supportive, and work through changing the belief, not just behavior.

As a client’s manager once stated, “if we have 100 people then we have 100 different personalities.” It’s your job as a manager to figure out what is the cause and the solution that works for all the unique individuals on your team.


Related Articles:

Article: 8 Reasons You Are Stuck in the Day to Day and Don’t Have a Reliable Team

Related Resources:

Download the “Guide to Building Your Team: Right People in the Right Jobs”

8 Reasons You're Stuck in the day-to-day and don't have a team to rely on

Read the Short Guide

Replace Your Broken Annual Review with “Ongoing Performance Management”

Replace Your Broken Annual Review with “Ongoing Performance Management”

In my last LinkedIn article, “Despite the flaws, don’t just stop your annual review”, I shared 5 articles and 3 books that explain why “everyone” hates the annual review process, BUT I cautioned just dropping this all together.

When companies stopped their performance review process, managers gave less feedback and employee performance dropped 10%!  (Wharton article)

So how can you give your team feedback in a positive way, that they enjoy, and that will ultimately achieve the intended goal to improve performance and engagement?

I am glad you asked!

Let me introduce you to “ongoing performance management.”

This process takes the best aspects of the annual review (yes there are some beneficial aspects), and combines it with weekly coaching and feedback, with a dose of training and development planning thrown in for good measure.

Such a hot topic – as I was writing this I received an email quoting a study by the Brandon Hall Group that showed that “organizations that made ongoing performance management a collaborative, strategic priority had better business results than those who didn’t.”

Companies who adopted ongoing performance management saw these improvements:

  • 70% reported an increase in revenue
  • 72% noticed a decrease in voluntary turnover
  • 54% experienced an increase in customer satisfaction

How did they do it?

Organizations are adoping three new methods:

  • ongoing feedback- usually weekly or monthly “one on ones” between managers and each employee individually
  • “ratingless reviews” – without the focus on employee rating on a scale from 1 to 5
  • “crowd-sourced feedback”- input and feedback from peers and direct reports (if a manager) are included, not just an employee’s boss

Companies who saw the best results didn’t stop the annual performance discussion, they shifted the focus to more of an overview of key learnings and jointly created development goals for the next year.

This is what employees want to know– “how can I learn, grow, and perform better next year?”

When companies ADDED these three methods (together) to the annual discussion between an employee and manager, they saw improvements in strategic alignment, developing a performance culture, support of company values and strategy, and yes, increased company performance.

This combination of “cutting edge” practices provided more focused and useful feedback, while increasing both manager and employee experience with the performance management process. [See graph]

Said another way, people like this process better and feel it is more effective on the things that matter– improving employee and company performance.

For more information on how this process works, visit our website page for more resources:

http://people-plan.com/coaching-accountability-performance/